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Applying X.500 Naming Conventions to NDS

Articles and Tips: article

BERND KUNZE
Consultant
Novell Consulting Services, Europe

01 Jan 1996


Since its introduction in 1993, NetWare Directory Services (NDS) has become the standard for business-oriented implementation of the X.500 directory service. This Application Note explores the heritage of NDS and offers considerations for X.500-based naming standards for use in the business environment.

Introduction

As global networking becomes a standard demand, so it has become necessary to store information describing the global network in a way which is accessible to both users and system administrators.

Administering and using information about services and people on a global network requires a directory which stores all the relevant data. To accomplish this, Novell introduced NDS (NetWare Directory Services) with NetWare 4 in 1993. However, Novell did not invent the idea of a global directory. This AppNote will begin with a brief overview of X.500 and the heritage of NDS. Subsequent sections deal with naming standards and naming considerations.

X.500 Overview

The past decade has seen tremendous growth in the deployment of technology for person-to-person communications. Today's electronic infrastructure allows this communication to occur, provided that a communication path to that person is known. Historically, this issue has long ago been seen and resolved in the area of telephone communication. Telephone technology had a similar growth rate, which necessitated rapid development of a phone directory system.

CCITT proposed a solution to the electronic communication problem by providing definitions for a directory containing both humans and resources on a network. This was the birth of the X.500 recommendations.

It is important to understand that the X.500 recommendations do not describe a readily available application. X.500 is simply a definition of services and data. The application development forming the user interface and the system code is left to the computer industry.

Heritage of NDS

As a standard, X.500 forms the foundation of NDS. However, the basic X.500 objects and attributes did not scale very well in a business environment. Without object types defining resources such as computers, printers, and file servers, a directory is limited to Yellow Pages functionality.

In order to introduce these new object and attribute types to NDS, Novell followed the CCITT recommendations and added them in a transparent and portable way.

For utmost flexibility the directory contains within itself definitions for objects, attributes and various administrative values which are not visible to the user. These definitions reside in an invisible portion of the directory tree called the schema. If you are a developer, think of the schema as a Class Library which contains basic object definitions. In order to create a new object one takes an existing object and adds new features to it. This way the class which was inherited remains intact and the new object type is placed in the Class Library as well. An application which needs to now the in and outs of an object type does not need to have these information hardcoded but reads the schema definition of the object. Changes made to object types do not require change of application source code.

From a user's or administrator's perspective, think of the schema as the "social rules" which are passed between generations. Each generation inherits a set of rules, adds new features to them, and passes the new set on to the next generation.

Why Are Naming Conventions Needed?

The requirements for naming standards are obvious. How would one use a phone directory in which the entries were sorted by date of entry instead of alphabetically?

As the requirements are obvious, the question of which naming standard remains. Fortunately some work has already been done on this. The Internet community has come up with documents discussing naming standards and naming considerations: "RFC1617: Naming and Structuring Guidelines for X.500" and "RFC1781: Using the OSI Directory to Achieve User Friendly Naming".

As with other distributed databases, such as DNS, one administrator may not be sufficient to administer the entire directory tree alone. In order to share the work among multiple persons, authority over a portion of the Directory tree (also called an Administrative Area or a Directory Management Domain) is handed to other administrators.

The logistical problem is clear. If, for instance, three administrators are setting up naming standards for their Administrative Area, chances are that all three will implement a different standard.

In the sample tree shown in Figure 1, the administrator at the O=Novell level authorizes the administrator at OU=Eng to manage all objects below it. In turn, the administrator at OU=Eng may authorize the administrator at OU=NDS to manage its area of the directory.

Figure 1: Sample hierarchical tree structure.

General Naming Considerations

Creation of a naming standard includes documenting these standards so that users of the global network are enabled to set up the correct search patterns and transmit them to the directory.

Search patterns are used to locate services or people in the Directory tree. For example, if an HP printer is needed for use with a specific application like a word processor, the user simply uses the NLIST command to search the tree beginning at the current context for the object. A sample search with NLIST would be initiated with this command line:

NLIST Printer=*HP* /s

The search begins with the current container and continues searching all subcontainers.

Here are some other issues to be considered:

  • Plan the tree with growth in mind. While the Directory tree is relatively small, it is easy to keep location and function of objects in mind. Once the tree grows, however, self-explanatory names are more convenient to work with.

  • Names shall be short, descriptive and easy to remember. Keep in mind that resources in the tree are used frequently by users of the tree. Long and cryptic names lead to counter-productivity and frustration. Shortand descriptive names, on the other hand, can easily be remembered and reduce training time for new or migrated employees.

  • Usage of international standards is preferred. It is important to apply international rules, especially in a global tree. For example, the country codes listed in Appendix A are derived from an international standard [ISO 3166].

  • Use national standards where international standards do not apply. Various countries may have individual specifications for data-for example, street address conventions vary from country to country. Also, ZIP codes and telephone number formats are standardized within individual countries.

  • Use of national characters. Novell went well beyond the X.500 recommendations by introducing UNICODE character mapping to ensure that national characters like Ę,Ę and Ń are represented correctly regardless of where in the world the user of the directory resides. While NDS does support national characters, it is worth while to notice that this is advantageous since very few of the current X.500 implementations deal with this sort of issue. Typical users will browse the directory tree using Graphical User Interface applications. Administrators and advanced users who may wish to perform non-GUI searches on the tree may want to use the national characters in the Common Name attribute and use ASCII characters only in the Other Names attribute. For instance, use Hans SÖrensen as the Common Name and Hans Soerensen as Other Names. Umlauts like Ö Ö Ö then appear as oe, ae and ue in Other Names, ß appears as ss, and so on.

  • Use logical rules where both international and national characters do not apply. In the likely event that no naming conventions for certain objects exist, human-interpretable templates should be used to support naming, using and searching the tree. The section "Naming Network Resources" details examples for templates.

  • Should spaces be used in names? Spaces within names are allowed. Certain implications are present with the use of the space character. Non-GUI users may need to use quotation marks for the name. For example, the user object Bernd Kunze would log in through login" Bernd Kunze".users.novell. Using spaces in object naming may confuse users of the Directory since a name like Bernd Kunze is not viewed as a single entity but as two words.

  • Provide user documentation about the company wide naming standard as a reference. It is a good idea to document the naming standards before implementing them. The documented standard leads to higher discipline in naming during tree design and can be used to better support users and administrators in case of questions.

Exceptions to the Rules

Keep exceptions as minimal as possible. Although there will always be exceptions to the naming standards, avoid having exceptions as much as possible to keep things easy for administrators and users. Each time an exception is proposed, consider carefully whether the exception is really needed. Document any necessary exceptions from the rules in the user reference.

Object Naming Guidelines

Country Objects. Country objects (also shown as C=<country code>) should be named in a unique way so that international directory users are able to specify the correct country in search operations. [ISO 3166] defines country codes for almost all countries (see Appendix A). Hence the use of these internationally agreed-upon country codes is suggested. The national representation of the country name can be placed into the Description attribute of the Country object (Figure 2).

Figure 2: Sample Country object information screen.

Organization Objects. Organizations (abbreviated as O=<organization name> are to be named according to their commonly-used names. If the mainly-used name is an abbreviation, use the abbreviation as the organization name and the unabbrevi-ated name as the Other Name for the organization. If the tree is supposed to be visible from outside of the organization, contact information such as Telephone and Fax Number should be provided in the associated attributes (see Figure 3).

Figure 3: Sample Organization object definition screen.

Organizational Unit Objects. OrganizationalUnits (OU=<organizational unit name>) shall reflect the organization scheme of the organization. If the organization scheme already features distinguishable names for departments, they shall be used.

User Objects. Naming human users in a consistent way is particularly critical. The name of a user is defined as a Common Name(CN=<common name<). It is suggested that the naming of those objects follow a standard format. For most countries the format <first-name< <surname< is the most sensible approach. You can use Other Name for an alternative naming of the object (see Figure 4). [RFC 1617] gives an example:

Steve Kille is the name most commonly used to identify this particular human while Stephen E. Kille is the syntactically correct but less often used name. The former would be used as the Common Name while the latter would be used in Other Name.

Alternatively, it is common to form eight-character names by taking the first character from the first name and up to seven characters from the surname. So Steve Kille would become skille. Another example would be bfranken for Bob Frankenberg.

Titles should not be used in the Common Name, but should be specified in the Title attribute.

Figure 4: Sample User object information screen.

Street Address information (including State or Province, Postal Address, and so on) needs to follow the postal mail rules of the country where the object physically resides. Every local postal office should be able to provide syntactical rules for the given country. For example, in some countries like France and the USA, the street address is formed by placing the house number before the street name. Other European countries prefer the house number after the street name.

Access information such as Telephone Number and Facsimile Telephone Number should follow a common format throughout the tree. A typical scheme could be:

+<country code< <area code< <phone number<

or        country-code   area code   phone number>

For example:

+49 211 56310

or       0049 211 56310

The first scheme is the more flexible approach. Some countries dial other codes than 00 before the country codes. The first format leaves it up to the user to know the prefix dial code. The second scheme tells the user exactly what to dial. The tradeoff here is that this scheme is not suitable if the tree covers countries where the country prefix differs from the quasi-standard of 00 (at least in Europe).


Note: There is no norm for international telephone country codes. Although most countriesuse a common scheme, some countries differ from it.

Electronic access information like E-mail Address is dependent on the E-mail system used. Check out the administrative tools of your E-mail software to see if they provide a way to copy this information into the attribute.

Group Objects. Group Names (CN=<group name<) should reflect the activity of the group. Samples are Devp, Eng, Sales, IS, and so on (see Figure 5).

Figure 5: Sample Group object information screen.

Organizational Role Objects. Organizational Roles should reflect the actual role performed in the format:

<Function<_OR

For example: Mail_Administrator_OR.

Naming Network Resources

Since there are no commonly agreed-upon naming conventions for network resources, a naming scheme must be present at the time the tree is designed. Forming names for resources on the network should follow common rules as well so that names can be interpreted and services can be looked up easily. It is essential to balance naming between usability and prediction. Following is a diagram plus a naming example which shows the name and associated attribute (Print Queue Volume) for a Print Queue object.


Object

NamingScheme /Example

Key

File ServerPrint ServerQueue ServerComputer

XXX-YY-Z-##

- Examples -

DUS-IS-F-01 PRV-HR-T-14GER-NC-E-01

XXX = Company or Location(i.e. PRV, DUS, LON)

YY = Department(i.e. HR, IS)

Z = machine typeF = File Server,T = Test Server,P= Print Server,C = Communication Server,S= SAA Server,E = E-MAIL Server,R =Dial in/out Server,M = Network Management,X= FAX Server,D = Database/SQL Server,A= Application Server,U = Unix Workstation,O= OS/2 Workstation,W = Windows Workstation,

## = Numbering (01 .. 99)

Printers

YY-TTT-LLL-##P

- Examples -

IS-LJT-PCL-01PHR-HP4-PS-00P

See below

Print Queues

YY-TTT-LLL-##Q

- Examples -

IS-LJT-PCL-01QHR-HP4-PS-12Q

YY = Departmentor SiteTTT = Type(LJT, DJT, PLT, etc).LLL= Printer Language(PCL or PS)## = Numbering(01 .. 99)

Volumes

Unspecific

Short andrecognizable names, i.e.APPS, HOME, DATA, DEV

Please keep in mind that the above is an example. Although it can be implemented as-is, you should verify whether this naming scheme fits the organization. For instance, in large organizations it may be necessary to include the physical location of the object in the name (floor and/or room numbers). In smaller organizations, inclusion of the physical location would lead to unnecessarily long names and can be omitted.

Figure 6: Sample Print Queue Object definition screen.

Documentation Issues

It is probably best to provide two different sets of naming documentation: one for administrators of the tree as a common naming standards platform, and a second set for users of the tree. Whether the documentation is provided on paper or electronically depends on the frequency of structural changes planned. In general, a good naming standard shouldn't change much once it has gone through testing and implementation.

Readily available documentation also eases the start-up process for new employees and new administrators.

Browsing the Directory

Being able to browse the directory for information is a key feature of a directory device. In large trees, however, this can be a time consuming task. NDS offers client utilities such as NLIST for automation of this task. However, users need to know the syntactical rules used to name the object so that the same rules can be applied to search requests.

The user-visible representation of objects and attributes is different among the various NDS utilities at this time. As a convenience, a list is provided in Appendix B reflecting objects and attribute naming across X.500, NDS Schema, NetAdmin/NWAdmin, NLIST and Login Script usage. Appendix B also demonstrates that NDS is not only implemented using the X.500 Specifications, but is also extending the schema suggested by CCITT. Many objects which are found in NDS are not found in X.500. As we have seen above, this is no contradiction to the X.500 recommendations since the recommendations explicitly encourage schema extension.

Registering an Organization Name

Novell recently announced its strategy for the future including a global network maintained by NetWare Directory Services. Novell will cooperate with national telecom providers such as AT&T, Deutsche Telekom, Unisource of Netherlands, Telstra of Australia and NTT of Japan to provide global access. In order to provide uniqueness of organization names, it may be required to register the organization name with the specific telecom provider.

In the US, a forum called the North American Directory Forum (NADF) defined naming rules. For instance, any organization which has already acquired a registered name (through legal services or the American National Standards Institute) shall use this name. However, NADF is restricted to the US and Canada. Individual countries may have individual naming rules.

Linking an organization tree into a global tree can be done through service providers (AT&T, Deutsche TeleCom, and others) once the infrastructure is fully available. Joining the global tree requires the organization name to be registered so that naming collisions are avoided. The service provider handles the registration details.

This step may also require minor changes in tree design affecting the order of the objects in the tree. The change in order would be necessary if the service provider features a geographical tree design and requires the Organization object at the top of each subtree.

In this context, it is important to understand the differences between international organizations and multi-national organizations. International organizations are defined as supra-national, quasi-governmental organizations (for example, the United Nations), whereas multi-national organizations are mostly commercial organizations operating in various countries.

International organizations are allowed to be placed directly under [Root]. Multi-national organizations are not allowed to follow the same order, with the exception of commercial organizations which are indispensable for the networks infrastructure (for example, the Internet).

Summary

NDS takes the CCITT X.500 definition of a directory service towards a truly business-oriented implementation, allowing the use of a global tree in day-to-day business and world-wide use. New object and attributes have been added to NDS using the X.500 recommendations for schema extensions.

By investing in establishing a naming convention, tree administrators greatly enhance the usability of the Directory. Preferably, international and national defined conventions are used; in absence of these, logical rules are set in place. However, there is no right or wrong way of naming. If users and administrators are satisfied with the usability, the goal of naming is achieved. Finally, documenting the naming conventions and the standards used concludes the process and acts as a reference point for the users of the tree.

Glossary

Attribute. A value attached to an object that describes the object (also known as a property)

CCITT. International Telephone and Telegraph Consultative Committee

Directory. Collection of information structured logically (for instance, a phone directory)

Directory Tree. Entries of the Directory Services database represented in hierarchical format

NDS. NetWare Directory Services

Object. An entry in the Directory Services database

White Pages. Telephone directory containing participants in the phone system, sorted alphabetically by name. On the Internet, also known as browsable directory of users at a specific campus.

Yellow Pages. Telephone directory sorted by facilities in the phone system. Contains companies and service providers. Used as a synonym for Network Information Services (NIS) in the UNIX world.

Bibliography

RFCs


Number

Author & Title

1617

Barker, P.; Hardcastle-Kille, S.; Lenggenhager,T. Namingand Structuring Guidelines for X.500 Directory Pilots. 1994 May; 28p.

1781

Kille, S. Using the OSI Directory to Achieve User FriendlyNaming.1995 March; 26p.

1837

Kille, S. Representing Tables and Subtreesin the X.500Directory. 1995 August;

1804

Mansfield, G.; Rajeev, P.; Raghavan, S.; Howes,T. SchemaPublishing in X.500 Directory. 1995 June;

1803

Wright, R.; Getchell, A.; Howes, T.; Sataluri, S.; Yee, P.; Yeong, W. Recommendations for an X.500 Production Directory Service. 1995 June;

1309

Weider, C.; Reynolds, J.; Heker, S. Technical Overviewof Directory Services Using the X.500 Protocol. 1992 March; 16 p.

1308

Weider, C.; Reynolds, J. Executive Introduction to DirectoryServices Using the X.500 Protocol. 1992 March; 4p.

1276

Hardcastle-Kille, S. Replication and Distributed Operationsextensions to provide an Internet Directory using X.500. 1991, November; 17 p.

1275

Hardcastle-Kille, S. Replication Requirements to provide anInternet Directory using X.500. 1991 November; 3 p.

1274

Barker, P.; Kille, S. The COSINE and Internet X.500 Schema.1991 November; 60 p.

Retrieving RFCs

RFCs are stored on many servers in the world. The official "home" of the RFCs is on a Unix server named nic.ddn.mil. They are available via either ftp or E-mail. For ftp access, the ftp service will detail information on how to navigate with your ftp client. For E­mail access, send a message to:

service@nic.ddn.mil

with the word "help" in the subject field.

A number of World Wide Web servers offer access to the RFCs. To find a server holding the RFCs, set your browser to the URL http://www.yahoo.com/ and specify "RFC" in the search field.

OSI/ISO Documentation

[X521] X.521 - The Directory: Selected Object Classes (ISO/IEC 9594-7) (Open Systems Interconnection)

[ISO-3166] - ISO country codes

Novell Documentation

Novell Application Notes, April 1993, page 55: "Planning a NetWare 4.0 Directory Tree"

Novell Application Notes, February 1994, page 5: "Implementing Naming Standards for NetWare Directory Services"

Appendix A: ISO 3166 Country Codes


CountryName
Code

Afghanistan

AF

Albania

AL

Algeria

DZ

Andorra

AD

Angola

AO

Anguilla

AI

Antarctica

AQ

Antiguaand Barbuda

AG

Argentina

AR

Armenia

AM

Aruba

AW

Australia

AU

Austria

AT

Azerbaijan

AZ

Bahamas

BS

Bahrain

BH

Bangladesh

BD

Barbados

BB

Belarus

BY

Belgium

BE

Belize

BZ

Benin

BJ

Bermuda

BM

Bhutan

BT

Bolivia

BO

Botswana

BW

BouvetIsland

BV

Brazil

BR

BritishIndian Ocean Territory

IO

Brunei

BN

Bulgaria

BG

BurkinaFaso

BF

Burundi

BI

Cambodia(Kampuchea)

KH

Cameroon

CM

Canada

CA

Cape Verde

CV

CaymanIslands

KY

CentralAfrican Republic

CF

Chad

TD

Chile

CL

China

CN

ChristmasIsland

CX

Cocos (Keeling)Islands

CC

Colombia

CO

ComoroIslands

KM

Congo

CG

Cook Islands

CK

Costa Rica

CR

Croatia

HR

Cuba

CU

Cyprus

CY

Czech Republic

CZ

Denmark

DK

Djibouti

DJ

Dominica

DM

DominicanRepublic

DO

Ecuador

EC

Egypt

EG

El Salvador

SV

EquatorialGuinea

GQ

Estonia

EE

Ethiopia

ET

FalklandIslands (Malvinas)

FK

Faroe Islands

FO

Fiji

FJ

Finland

FI

France

FR

Gabon

GA

Gambia

GM

Georgia

GE

Germany

DE

Ghana

GH

Gibraltar

GI

Greece

GR

Greenland

GL

Grenada

GD

Guadeloupe

GP

Guam

GU

Guatemala

GT

Guiana(French)

GF

Guinea

GN

GuineaBissau

GW

Guyana

GY

Haiti

HT

Honduras

HN

Hong Kong

HK

Hungary

HU

Iceland

IS

India

IN

Indonesia

ID

Iran

IR

Iraq

IQ

Ireland

IE

Israel

IL

Italy

IT

Ivory Coast

CI

Jamaica

JM

Japan

JP

Johnston Island

JT

Jordan

JO

Kazakhstan

KZ

Kenya

KE

Kiribati

KI

Korea (North)

KP

Korea (South)

KR

Kuwait

KW

Kyrgyzstan

KG

Laos

LA

Latvia

LV

Lebanon

LB

Lesotho

LS

Liberia

LR

Libya

LY

Liechtenstein

LI

Lithuania

LT

Luxembourg

LU

Macau

MO

Madagascar

MG

Malawi

MW

Malaysia

MY

Maldives

MV

Mali

ML

Malta

MT

MarshallIslands

MH

Martinique

MQ

Mauritania

MR

Mauritius

MU

Mexico

MX

Micronesia

FM

Midway Islands

MI

Moldavia

MD

Monaco

MC

Mongolia

MN

Montserrat

MS

Morocco

MA

Mozambique

MZ

Myanmar

MM

Namibia

NA

Nauru

NR

Nepal

NP

Netherlands

NL

Netherlands Antilles

AN

New Caledonia

NC

New Zealand

NZ

Nicaragua

NI

Niger

NE

Nigeria

NG

Niue

NU

Norfolk Island

NF

Norway

NO

Oman

OM

Pacific Islands (US)

PC

Pakistan

PK

Panama

PA

Papua New Guinea

PG

Paraguay

PY

Peru

PE

Philippines

PH

Pitcairn Islands

PN

Poland

PL

Polynesia (French)

PF

Portugal

PT

Puerto Rico

PR

Qatar

QA

Reunion

RE

Romania

RO

Russia

RU

Rwanda

RW

Sahara (Western)

EH

Saint Helena

SH

Saint Kitts and Nevis

KN

Saint Lucia

LC

Saint Pierre and Miquelon

PM

Saint Vincent and Grenadines

VC

Samoa (American)

AS

Samoa (Western)

WS

San Marino

SM

Sao Tome and Principe

ST

Saudi Arabia

SA

Senegal

SN

Seychelles

SC

Sierra Leone

SL

Singapore

SG

Slovakia

SK

Slovenia

SI

Solomon Islands

SB

Somalia

SO

South Africa

ZA

Spain

ES

Sri Lanka

LK

Sudan

SD

Surinam

SR

Swaziland

SZ

Sweden

SE

Switzerland

CH

Syria

SY

Tadzhikistan

TJ

Taiwan

TW

Tanzania

TZ

Thailand

TH

Timor (East)

TP

Togo

TG

Tokelau

TK

Tonga

TO

Trinidad and Tobago

TT

Tunisia

TN

Turkey

TR

Turkmenistan

TM

Turks and Caicos Islands

TC

Tuvalu

TV

Uganda

UG

Ukraine

UA

United Arab Emirates

AE

United Kingdom

GB

United States of America

US

Uruguay

UY

Uzbekistan

UZ

Vanuatu

VU

Vatican

VA

Venezuela

VE

Vietnam

VN

Virgin Islands (British)

VG

Virgin Islands (US)

VI

Wake Island

WK

Wallis and Futuna Islands

WF

Yemen

YE

Yugoslavia

YU

Zaire

ZR

Zambia

ZM

Zimbabwe

ZW

Appendix BY: Selected Objects and Attributes

Table 1: Object Class Reference.


X.500 (X.521)
NDS
NetAdmin Nwadmin NLIST
UIMPORT
Login Script

Country

Country

Country

Locality

Locality

Locality

Organization

Organization

Organization

Organizational Unit

Organizational Unit

Organizational Unit

Person

Person

Person

Organizational Person

Organizational Person

Organizational Person

Organizational Role

Organizational Role

Organizational Role

Group of Names

Group

Group

Group Of Unique Names

Residential Person

Application Process

Application Entity

DSA

Device

Device

Device

Strong Authentication User

User

User

User

Certification Authority

Alias

Alias

Computer

Computer

Printer

Printer

Resource

Resource

Queue

Queue

Volume

Volume

Volume

Directory Map

Directory Map

Profile

Profile

Server

Server

NCP Server

NCP Server

Print Server

Print Server

CommExec

CommExec

Bindery Object

Bindery Object

AFP Server

AFP Server

Messaging Server

Messaging Server

Message Routing Group

Message Routing Group

External Entity

External Entity

List

List

Table 2: Attribute Reference.


X.500 (X.520)
NDS
NetAdminNWAdminNLIST
UIMPORT
Login Script

Object Class

Object Class

Object Class

OBJECT_CLASS

Aliased Object Name

ALiased Object Name

Aliased Object Name

Knowledge Information

Common Name

CN (Common Name)

Name /Other Names

NameOther names

CN / LOGIN_NAME

Surname

Surname

Last Name

Last Name

LAST_NAME/SURNAME

Serial Number

Country Name

C (Country Name)

Country Name

Locality Name

L (Locality Name)

Locality

L

State or Province Name

S (State or Province Name)

State or Province /Mailing Label Information

State orProvince / Mailing Label Information

S

Street Address

SA (Street Address)

Street Address / Mailing Label Information

Street Address / Mailing Label Information

SA

Organization Name

O (Organization Name)

Organization Name

Organizational Unit Name

OU (Organizational Unit Name)

Department

Department

OU

Title

Title

Title

Title

TITLE

Description

Description

Description

Description

DESCRIPTION

Search Guide

Business Category

Postal Address

Postal Address

Postal Address /Mailing Label Information

City /Mailing Label Information

POSTAL_ADDRESS

Postal Code

Postal Code

Post Code/Mailing Label Information

Postal (zip) code / Mailing Label Information

POSTAL_CODE

Post Office Box

Postal Office Box

Post Office Box /Mailing Label Information

Post Office Box / Mailing Label Information

POSTAL_OFFICE_BOX

Physical Delivery Office Name

Physical Delivery Office Name

Physical Delivery Office Name

PHYSICAL_DELIVERY_OFFICE_NAME

Telephone Number

Telephone Number

Telephone Number

Telephone

TELEPHONE_NUMBER

Telex Number

Teletex Terminal Indentifier

Facsimilie Telephone Number

Facsimile Telephone Number

Facsimile Telephone Number

FACSIMILE_TELEPHONE_NUMBER

X.121 Address

International ISDN Number

Registered Address

Destination Indicator

Preferred Delivery Method

Presentation Address

Supported Application Context

Member

Member

Member

Owner

Role Occupant

Role Occupant

Role Occupant

See Also

See Also

See Also

SEE_ALSO

User Password

CA Certificate

CA Public Key

CA Public Key

Authority Revocation List

Authority Revocation

Authority Revocation

Certificate Revocation List

Certificate Revocation

Certificate Revocation

Cross Certificate Pair

Cross Certificate Pair

Cross Certificate Pair

CA Private Key

ACL

Object Trusstees

Back Link

Bindery Property

Bindery Object Restriction

Bindery Type

Cartridge

Cartridge

Printer Configuration

Printer Configuration

Convergence Attribute

Convergence

Default Queue

Default Queue

Partition Creation Time

High Convergence Sync Interval

Group Membership

Group Membership

Group membership

GROUP_MEMBERSHIP

Home Directory

Home Directory

HOME_DIRECTORY

Host Device

Host Device

Host Resource

Host Resource Name

Host Server

Host Server

Inherited ACL

Inherited ACL

Login Allowed Time Map

Login Allowed Time Map

Login Disabled

Login Disabled

Account disabled

LOGIN_DISABLED

Login Expiration Time

Login Expiration Time

Account Has Expiration Date

Login Grace Limit

Login Grace Limit

Limit Grace Logins

LOGIN_GRACE_LIMIT

Login Grace Remaining

Login Grace Remaining

Remaining Grace Logins

LOGIN_GRACE_REMAINING

Login Intruder Address

Login Intruder Address

Login Intruder Attempts

Login Intruder Attempts

Login Intruder Limit

Login Intruder Limit

Intruder Attempt Reset Interval

Intruder Attempt Reset Interval

Login Intruder Reset Time

Login Intruder Reset Time

Login Maximum Simultaneous

Login Maximum Simultaneous

Maximum Connections

LOGIN_MAXIMUM_SIMULTANEOUS

Login Script

Login Script

Login Script

Login Time

Login Time

Memory

Memory

Email Address

Email Address

EMAIL_ADDRESS

Network Address

Network Address

NETWORK

Network Address Restriction

Network Address Restriction

Notify

Notify

Operator

Operator

Operator

Operator

Owner

Owner

Obituary

Page Description Language

Page Description Language

Passwords Used

Passwords Used

PASSWORDS_USED

Password Allow Change

Password Allow Change

Allow user to change password

PASSWORD_ALLOW_CHANGE

Password Expiration Interval

Password Expiration Interval

Days between forced changes

Password Expiration Time

Password Expiration Time

Date password expires

PASSWORD_EXPIRATION_TIME

Password Minimum Length

Password Minimum Length

Minimum password length

PASSWORD_MINIMUM_LENGTH

Password Required

Password Required

Require a password

PASSWORD_REQUIRED

Password Unique Required

Password Unique Required

Require unique passwords

PASSWORD_UNIQUE_REQUIRED

Path

Path

Print Job Configuration

Print Job Configuration

Printer Control

Printer Control

Private Key

Profile

Profile

Profile

PROFILE

Public Key

Queue

Queue Directory

Queue Directory

Reference

Replica

Replica

Resource

Resource

Higher Privileges

Higher Privileges

HIGHER_PRIVILEGES

Security Equals

Security Equals

SECURITY_EQUAL

Serial Number

Serial Number

Server

Server

Status

Status

Supported Typefaces

Supported Typefaces

Supported Services

Supported Services

Unknown

Unknown

User

Version

Version

Account Balance

Account Balance

Account Balance

ACCOUNT_BALANCE

Allow Unlimited Credit

Allow Unlimited Credit

Allow Unlimited Credit

ALLOW_UNLIMITED_CREDIT

Low Convergency Reset Time

Minimum Account Balance

Minimum Account Balance

Low Balance Limut

MINIMUM_ACCOUNT_BALANCE

Low Convergency Sync Interval

Device

Device

Message Server

MESSAGE_SERVER

Language

Language

Language

LANGUAGE

Supported Connections

Supported Connections

Type Creator Map

Type Creator Map

Locked By Intruder

Locked By Intruder

LOCKED_BY_INTRUDER

UID

UID

GID

GID

Unknown Base Class

Unknown Base Class

Received Up To

Synchronized Up To

Locked By Intruder

Printer

Printer

Detect Intruder

Detect Intruder

Lockout After Detection

Lockout After Detection

Intruder Lockout Reset Interval

Intruder Lockout Reset Interval

Server Holds

Server Holds

SERVER_HOLDS

SAP Name

SAP Name

Volume

Volume

Last Login Time

Last Login Time

Print Server

Print Server

NNS Domain

NNS Domain

Full Name

Full Name

Full Name

FULL_NAME

Partition Control

Partition Control

Revision

Revision

Certificate Validity Interval

Certificate Validity Interval

CERTIFICATE_VALIDITY_INTERVAL

External Synchronizer

External Synchronizer

Messaging Database Location

Messaging Database Location

Message Routing Group

Message Routing Group

Postmaster

Postmaster

Mailbox Location

Mailbox Location

MAILBOX_LOCATION

Mailbox ID

Mailbox ID

MAILBOX_ID

External Name

External Name

Security Flags

Security Flags

SECURITY_FLAGS

Messaging Server Type

Messaging Server Type

Given Name

Given Name

Given Name

GIVEN_NAME

Initials

Initials

Initials

INITIALS

Generational Qualifier

Generational Qualifier

GENERATIONAL_QUALIFIER

Profile Membership

Profile Membership

DS Revision Attribute

Supported Gateway

Supported Gateway

Equivalent To Me

Equivalent To Me

EQUIVALENT_TO_ME

Replica Up To

* Originally published in Novell AppNotes


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The origin of this information may be internal or external to Novell. While Novell makes all reasonable efforts to verify this information, Novell does not make explicit or implied claims to its validity.

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